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Developed News Story | CASE OF SOCIAL MEDIA BIOMETRICS THROUGH KEYLOGGER EMPLOYEE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Biometric data is increasingly used to enable employees to clock on and off at the workplace. But the sensitivity of this data gives some countries cause for concern. For example, in Israel, in the case of Qalansawe, the court found against the employer for requiring employees to clock on using fingerprints. Meanwhile, the French Data Protection Authority recently imposed a EUR 10,000 fine on a company that monitored its employees using fingerprint recognition. It failed to show exceptional circumstances requiring the use of biometrics under the keylogger employee management system, making it unlawful.

INCREASE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

Remote work employee management system helps identify the cause of disengagement and provides continuous, automated feedback based on user behavior and activities so it can be addressed

  • Use to develop your own KPIs and metrics to measure remote employee engagement
  • See how long remote employees are active if they’re spending too much time on social media or getting buried in meetings or emails
  • Address communication issues by identifying which methods work best for remote employees (i.e.- email/phone/IM)
  • Reduce time spent developing performance reviews by automatically identifying top and low-performing employees

WHAT IS PRIVATE AND WHAT IS PUBLIC

There is no shortage of cases from around the world involving posts on Facebook as the courts grapple with whether employees can legitimately be dismissed for reputationally damaging posts. In many countries, the issue turns to what is private and what is public. In France, comments by employees on Facebook are generally considered private and are protected under freedom of expression – but this is only if the posts are made to a ‘private’ circle of ‘friends’. If an employee defames the employer publicly, this can lead to dismissal.

In New Zealand, an interesting case from 2015 (Hammond – v – Credit Union Baywide) reverses the focus by considering what happens when the employer tracks private posts and then goes on to misuse them. Ms. Hammond was dismissed from Credit Union Baywide and later held a small function where she served a cake, iced with an expletive towards Credit Union Baywide. She posted a photo of the cake on Facebook, accessible only to her Facebook ‘friends’. Credit Union Baywide heard about it and asked a current employee who was a Facebook friend, to access it for them. They then distributed the photo to other potential employers to ensure they wouldn’t get another job. Ms. Hammond took out a breach of privacy claim and was awarded record damages of NZD 168,070 (approximately EUR 100,000). One key to managing risk is to have a clear, suitable, and effective policy. In Ireland, an employee was awarded EUR 7,000 to compensate for his suspension for alleged gross misconduct. The employee had posted negative comments about his employer on social media – but crucially, the employer had no social media policy.

One key to managing risk is to have a clear, suitable, and effective policy under the keylogger employee management system. In Ireland, an employee was awarded EUR 7,000 to compensate for his suspension for alleged gross misconduct. The employee had posted negative comments about his employer on social media – but crucially, the employer had no social media policy.

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